3 Reasons Why Bacons Win Over RFID

Magda Szumlakowska How it works Leave a Comment

1) Beacons are more scalable than RFID

Beacon:

In the case of a BLE location system, beacons function as signal transmitters that are majorly battery-powered and can be configured with the help of a mobile app. This makes them scalable and highly portable. Also, the capability of beacons to allow smartphones to primarily act as the receivers makes it a highly accessible location technology.

RFID:

Deploying an RFID system requires a number of different components, including basic hardware such as tags, readers, reader control and an application software. Therefore, businesses that plan to put up an RFID program in place will need to plan ahead and invest upfront on the infrastructure front, on both the sender (tag) and receiver (reader) side.

2) Beacons have a greater range than RFID

Beacon:

Beacons typically have a wireless range of 1m to 70 m. Beacon range is dependent on ‘broadcasting signal power’. Higher the broadcasting signal power, greater the range at which mobile devices will be able to pick up the signal and convert it into information.

RFID:

While RFID makes it possible to identify up to 1000 tags per second at nearly 100% read rates, its accuracy varies based on a number of factors, primarily: frequency, readers and tag antennas.

3) Beacons are more secure because they don’t transmit data as opposed to RFID devices

Beacon:

Since beacons are primarily proximity detection devices that broadcast outbound signals, there is no inherent security risk in the transmission.

RFID:

Within RFID systems, the only real security threat lies in the RF communication that happens between the tags and readers. Primarily because unlike beacons that simply send a signal with a beacon identifier effectively saying “I’m here!”, RFID actually transmits data related to the product (the EPC or the Electronic Product Code). Few common forms of data security threats are rogue/clone tags, unauthorized riders, and side-channel attacks (interception of reader data by an unauthorized device).